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GREAT WHITE Plays Concert In North Dakota With No Restrictions In Place: No Social Distancing, No Masks (Video) – BLABBERMOUTH.NET

**July 11 UPDATE**: Earlier tonight, GREAT WHITE released the following statement to BLABBERMOUTH.NET via the band’s publicist: “GREAT WHITE would like to address our Thursday, July 9, at First On …

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**July 11 UPDATE**: Earlier tonight, GREAT WHITE released the following statement to BLABBERMOUTH.NET via the band’s publicist: “GREAT WHITE would like to address our Thursday, July 9, at First On First Dickinson Summer Nights concert in North Dakota.
“We understand that there are some people who are upset that we performed this show, during this trying time. We assure you that we worked with the Promoter. North Dakota’s government recommends masks be worn, however, we are not in a position to enforce the laws.
“We have had the luxury of hindsight and we would like to apologize to those who disagree with our decision to fulfill our contractual agreement.
“The Promoter and staff were nothing but professional and assured us of the safety precautions.
“Our intent was simply to perform our gig, outside, in a welcoming, small town.
“We value the health and safety of each and every one of our fans, as well as our American and global community.
“We are far from perfect.”
The original article follows below.
GREAT WHITE played an outdoor show this past Thursday night (July 9) in Dickinson, North Dakota as part of “First On First: Dickinson Summer Nights”. Video footage of the concert is available below. More video, shot from a different location, can be found here.
While numerous events have been imposing restrictions, such as wearing masks and social distancing, “First On First” has no such rules in place.
“We do not have restrictions, believe it or not, we don’t have any,” April Getz, an event coordinator for Odd Fellows, which organizes, runs and comes up with the funding for the events, told The Dickinson Press. “It’s one of those things where if people feel comfortable coming down and mixing and mingling, that’s their personal choice. We’re leaving it up to everybody that chooses to attend.”
As of Saturday (July 11), there have been a total of 4,243 confirmed coronavirus cases in North Dakota. A total of 87 people have died so far in the state as a result of COVID-19. 83 percent of those who have tested positive for COVID-19 in North Dakota to date have recovered from the virus.
An average of around 3,700 tests are being conducted daily in North Dakota, where the positivity rate has remained relatively low. 4,327 tests were conducted Friday, yielding a 2% positivity rate.
North Dakota’s pandemic-high number of active cases came May 21, when 670 residents were infected.
In the face of the coronavirus pandemic, thousands of concerts and festivals have either been postponed or canceled, as social distancing and self-quarantining make performing live music and attending live shows all but impossible.
Earlier in the month, former GREAT WHITE and current JACK RUSSELL’S GREAT WHITE singer Jack Russell blasted people who refuse to wear a mask in public spaces to protect others from possible infection.
Russell addressed the hot-button issue as lawmakers push harder for their constituents to wear face masks to limit the spread of coronavirus. President Donald Trump has been loath to wear a mask, despite the advice of public health experts.
Asked in an interview with Austria’s Mulatschag if he goes out often while in quarantine, Russell who lives on a 45-foot yacht in Redondo Beach, California said: “No. I go to the store when I have to. There’s no need to be out

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